Image sensor features low power, high frame rate




Targeting intelligent vision systems, ON Semiconductor unveils the ARX3A0 digital image sensor with 0.3 megapixel (MP) resolution in a 1:1 aspect ratio. The image sensor combines up to 360 frames per second (fps) capture rate similar to a global shutter with the performance and responsivity of a back-side illuminated (BSI) rolling shutter sensor.

Thanks to its small size, square form factor and high frame rate, the image sensor can be used in machine vision, artificial intelligence, and augmented reality/virtual reality (AR/VR) applications, as well as supplemental security cameras. One application example is AR/VR googles to monitor the wearer’s eye movements to help adjust the image viewed. In this application, the 1/10-inch square format enables low-height modules, while the 3.5-mm die size helps maximize the sensor’s field of view.

The ARX3A0 also addresses power challenges. The image sensor consumes less than 19 mW when capturing images at 30 fps, and 2.5 mW when capturing 1 fps. It also features advanced power management capabilities, such as automatically waking from a low-power mode when detecting motion or lighting changes in the scene. This allows the sensor to become the main source of wake for the camera system, saving additional system power.

The monochrome sensor is based on a 560 x 560 active-pixel array that features ON Semiconductor’s NIR+ technology. This gives the image sensor high sensitivity at near IR wavelengths to deliver excellent performance in no light or when lighting is used that is non-detectable by the human eye, said ON Semiconductor.

The ARX3A0 is available in both chip-scale package and reconstructed wafer die. Evaluation boards running on ON Semiconductor’s PC-based DevWare system and prototype modules are also available through ON Semiconductor and its authorized distributors.

>> This article was originally published on our sister site, Electronic Products: “High-speed, low-power image sensor targets intelligent vision systems.”

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Original article: Image sensor features low power, high frame rate
Author: Gina Roos