A Blazing Fast Graphics Library for Your SPI Color OLED Displays on an ATtiny85




If you’ve ever used an SPI (Serial Peripheral Interface) OLED display with a microcontroller, you likely took advantage of one of the existing graphics libraries out there. Adafruit’s SSD1331 library, for example, is a popular option that is easy to use. But, it doesn’t prioritize performance. If you require more speed or want to use a low-power microcontroller, check out David Johnson-Davies’ ATtiny85 Colour Graphics Library.

The problem with most SSD1331 OLED display graphics libraries is that they require a memory buffer. That buffer slows things down, and also limits which microcontrollers can be used. Johnson-Davies’ library skips the memory buffer and sends data directly via graphics accelerator commands that are built into the SSD1331 driver chip. That’s much faster, and a test to clear the screen showed that Johnson-Davies’ library is 100 times faster than the Adafruit library.

In addition to the speed increase, this uses fewer pins and can run on any processor. Specifically, Johnson-Davies experimented with an ATtiny85, which is one of the most humble microcontrollers available today. With a simple breadboard circuit, he was able to drive the 96×64, 64K colors SPI OLED display directly from the ATtiny85. If you want to try the library out for yourself, Johnson-Davies has provided a thorough explanation of how it works, as well as some example code.


A Blazing Fast Graphics Library for Your SPI Color OLED Displays on an ATtiny85 was originally published in Hackster Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Original article: A Blazing Fast Graphics Library for Your SPI Color OLED Displays on an ATtiny85
Author: Cameron Coward